RSS feed RSS Twitter Twitter Facebook Facebook 15 Questions 15 Questions

The reasons

img  Tobias

In an article for The Independent, Robert Maycock has some interesting remarks to make about why classical music may well be in a deep crisis. We have sumarised the most important points for you:

* Beethoven. His portrait of the artist as a loner, as a genius fighting against society and cultural limitations has produced the image of an artist that is detached from everyday problems and worries. Subsequently, the music such an artist produces, also seems to wander off into a secluded territory, which does not allow just anybody in. Without debate, however, the music will slowly die.

* Commissions. Governments have started subsidsing music by pooring funds into new compositions. This, however, has meant that few works have been performed more than just once - instead a culture of premieres has been established, and to pieces being forgotten soon after their debut.

* Labour-intensity. If a certain piece requires a certain amount of musicians, then this will set a limit to the orchestras ability to cut costs. This, in effect, also means that orchestras will increasingly simply absorb the money they receive and have nothing left to spend.

* Ignorance and intolerance. In order to forget about the problems, classical music has tried to fend off anyone unwanted into its premises. This has included racism, with many concerts being whites-only events.


The author points to some encouraging signs as well:

* Diversification. Orchestras such as the LSO have started entering neighbouring markets, such as recording albums and even offering albums for download. And then there's the success story of Classic FM, which has offered the music in a form previously unheard of.

* Cross-Over. Even though they may not exactly be changing anything or adding something artistically important, artists like Vanessa Mae have at least managed to find a sound economic basis for their career.

* Asia. In Japan and China, Classical Music is in fact a growth market with interested audiences and exciting new composers. Some of them have made their way into the West, thrilling listeners with a subtle combination of traditional Eastern and Western sounds.


Source: The Independent

Related articles

flag
The Crisis of Classical Music 13
The proud classical distributors are ...
2006-10-17
flag
Bridging the Divide
Spectrum goes to Carnegie
2005-12-29
flag
Hard Times
Why the Classical Music market ...
2005-10-04
flag
Download Masters
Classical Music is right there ...
2005-09-24
flag
Rock on
A very different concert experience
2005-09-15
flag
The Mozart Effect: None
A collection of current Mozart-related ...
2005-08-11
flag
Know the Score
German Media Market has a ...
2005-07-19
flag
klassik.popkomm
German WebZine offers guide through ...
2005-07-17
flag
Release the Pressure
A page for followers of ...
2005-07-15
flag
Jenkins triumphs
Welsh singer snaps up "Best ...
2005-05-28
flag
Truly Different Voices
Gal and Fernandes meet in ...
2005-05-18
flag
A cry for education
Sir Peter Maxwell Davies airs ...
2005-04-30

Partner sites

ad