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Vital Weekly 681 + 682

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PNDC & HOUSEWORK - SECONDHAND LANGUAGE (CD by Ammonite Records)
The music of Predrag Nedic, known as PNDC was a pleasant surprise back in Vital Weekly 616, not because he had the most original sound in the world, but his 'Fading Away' release was a nice break in all the hiss and buzz of Vital Weekly. Back then I didn't use the word unVital, but the music had not much to do with our daily digest of disturbances. Present in some ways on 'Fading Away' a greek singer called Housework, known as Thanos Vavaroutas to his friends. The prolific Nedic also works as Keep Away From Heat, but that's a more synth/techno pop inspired band. 'Secondhand Language' is his second full length as PNDC and now Housework gets full credit too. If I understand correctly they exchange sound files over the internet and do not meet up in the studio. That's something we hardly could hear on this release and that also goes for this new release. Vocals and instruments seem to be in perfect harmony. The music is still a fine blend of new wave with a love of the somewhat darker undercurrents. Its one man new wave, as lots comes out of boxes, rhythm machines, sound effects and on top guitars and the vocals of Housework. In the long 'The Fix' the darkness reaches a peak with a film noir like soundtrack, and that's a thread that goes through almost the entire album. A great album, once again, but maybe it should be more poplength, say thirty-five minutes, with just the very songs of it. No potential hit material here either, so it doesn't fulfill its pop sensitives just yet. But that may come, due time. (FdW)
Address: http://www.ammonite.co.rs

ANDREA NEUMANN - PAPPELALLEE 5 (CD by Absinthe Records)
Like Andrea Neumann in Berlin I share my house with others, who aren't musicians and who are away most of the time during the day, so I can work for you on my reviews in relatively quietness. But just how quiet is quiet anyway. On a bright sunny day I open my balcony doors and in the back there is a pet store, with some tropical bird that never gets sold - too noisy probably. Neumann wanted to work on a CD playing the inside piano (her tool of trade) and mixing desk, which required lots of complete silence. Hard in a house with Axel Dörner (trumpet player), Tony Buck (drums), Angela Ballhorn (piano) and her student on the flute and Ekke Pilz playing a CD. Like on a suggestion by Brian Eno's 'Oblique Strategies', she decided to use the sounds heard in a new piece. Recorded inside her own room are the sounds produced by the others and Neumann's own inside piano playing. This is of course where you have to crank up the volume to quite some extent before hearing anything but then it will reveal lots of information. Heavy noise, low trumpet rumble, an occasional plink and plonk on the inside piano. All in a great textured piece, with besides all of this, also silence. A refined composition arises of blocks of sound, blocks of silence and sometimes both. Even with open balcony doors a great work. (FdW)
Address: http://www.absintherecords.com

PEDESTRIAN DEPOSIT - AUSTERE (CD by Monorail Trespassing)
When Jonathan Borges was sixteen he started Pedestrian Deposit, which was in 2003. In the early days it was all about harsh noise, which lead to various releases on RRRecords, Hospital Productions and his own Monorail Trespassing label. I don't believe I heard any of those, and he had been quiet since 2006. In silence he worked on 'Austere', a new label which included besides Borges also Shannon Kennedy, who plays here violin, cello and various bowed metal objects. After reading all of this on the information I expected some harsh noise thing and surely there are moments of loud outbursts, I didn't take the title in account: this is certainly a work of austerity. The overall sound has mellowed down, and that surely benefitted the end result of this. Pedestrian Deposit works with electronic sound means, synthesizers perhaps, processed feedback and/or electronics and they appear at times in monolithic blocks, ney walls of sounds. But in making things more mellow he allows himself to actually compose with the sound material. Bringing in things like crescendo and decrescendo makes this noise much more interesting that just a howl of feedback. Tension, which should be the first and important thing of all good music, is not achieved by just a wall of sound, but as something that holds your attention and brings out real tension. In the fourth and fifth piece certainly getting closer to ambient then to noise, this is a great CD of intelligent noise music. Perhaps to the more narrow-minded a case of betrayal, but so be it then. (FdW) Address: http://www.monorailtrespassing.com

OUR LOVE WILL DESTROY THE WORLD/BARK HAZE (7" by Krayon Recordings)
GOLDEN OAKS THREE BILLION - WEEKEND PICNIC (CDR by Krayon Recordings)
PRAM WRECKER - ALPINE (CDR by Krayon Recordings)
A new label it seems to me, and they like their things droney and noisy, as proven by these two releases. Bark Haze is Andrew McGregor (whom I don't know) and the everlasting Sonic Youth Thurston Moore and their side of the 7" is an affair of surpressed feedback guitar noise and low humming drones. Not the best in the suppressed field of this kind of music, but nevertheless it lives, hums, and feeds nicely. The other side is Campbell Kneale's new project Our Love Will Destroy The World with a great tune for rotating sounds on the guitar and lots of sound effects swirling about, with some weird percussive 'bang' every now and then. Here the noise prevails over the drone and it makes a great piece. Top heavy yet with many details which is one of the things that lacks with Bark Haze.
On CDR format we come across the Golden Oaks Three Billion again, whose previous release on Dead Sea Liner was reviewed two weeks ago. Here again two pieces of drone music, built from 'primitive tape loops, guitar and electronics' and some 'antique clarinet vibrations' and whereas I wasn't too pleased with the previous one, I must say that 'Weekend Picnic' is quite nice. The drones are woven more finely. Highly minimal like loops always seem to do, and in both pieces here the clarinet plays free tunes on top of those. Maybe as a loop too, but somehow I think its played live on top of the drones. The recording quality seems to me to be improved and the music benefits from that in a great way. Again, not too long this release, but for what it is this seems to be the right length.
No information on the Pram Wrecker CDR. Boxes of 'Alpine' (water? beer?) are shown in the Warholian cover, so let's call this 'Alpine' and its a twenty-two minute guitar and distortion piece, highly minimal. It sounds like the guitar is burned down, or perhaps some sound effect that makes the sound a bit more vibrant. It grows over its course in intensity, but sadly it didn't do much for me I must admit. Sort of substandard guitar noise music, that never grabs the listener. In a live concert situation I can imagine this to be good though. (FdW) Address: http://www.krayonrecordings.net

JOE FRAWLEY ENSEMBLE - EMPEROR OF DAFFODILS (CDR, private)
One of the more interesting people I came across with in recent years is Joe Frawley, who released a bunch of really good CDRs of his version of plunderphonics, radio collage and musique concrete. Now he has an 'ensemble' which is himself on piano, found sounds and electronics, and by electronic mail delivery Greg Conte on guitars and Rachel Rambach on voice. A daffodil in French is a narcisse, named after the mythic figure in love with himself. Apparently on the internet there a videos of young woman doing her make-up and looking at herself and these fascinating videos (more than a dozen actually) lead to this work for the ensemble, his most 'programmatic' until now (as opposed to 'absolute'). A sort of a small opera piece, in which the beautiful voice of Rachel Rambach sings the word 'Lipstick' in the track of the same name over and over again. She sighs, signs, speaks, while the guitar and piano provide a dreamlike soundtrack, added with extra layers of spacious electronics. This dwells less on the musique concrete part of his previous work (despite the sound of a photo camera in 'Masque' for instance), but rather seems to be working towards a finished song structure. This break with the past is quite nice (but not yet necessary, as I thought Frawley hadn't explored his full possibilities in that respect), and the expansion shows he can do so much more. This is another great work by Frawley, dream pop like. I didn't think it was possible. (FdW)
Address: http://www.joefrawleymusic.info

MUSO FANTASMA - SE PUEDE BAILAR CON LOS DEMONIOS PERO SIEMPRE EN ACTITUO DE FIESTA (CDR by Moremars)
DIATRIBES WITH DRAGOS TARA AND PIERO SK - L'INSTANT D'APRES (CDR by Moremars/Insurdinations)
Two releases from the new greek cdr-label Moremars, one being a collaboration with the swiss netlabel Insubordiantions. With the release by Muso Fantasma we are presented to a duo from Spain: Pedro Amodio (voice, lyrics, samplers and efects) and Adriana Petit (voice, lyrics, samplers, keyboard, electric guitar, industrial percussion). Their debut was recorded in 2007 and 2008 "between" Mallorca and Madrid. The tracks on this CDR can be divided roughly into two parts. The first part consists of pieces where they flirt with of old music recordings, like old tango music in 'Tango Maldito'. Not so strange as Amodio comes originally from Argentina. And also not so strange these tracks have a strong nostalgic flavor. This is absolutely not the case with the pieces that belong to the other part. These are built around primitive beats and simple rhythms, like "Mente Terrenal". In both cases spoken word is often prominently added. So it helps if you understand spanish. The term collage comes most close, I guess, to how this music came about. This is also reflected in the artwork on the cover, etc. With these strange amalgam of influences Amodio and Petit create their own personal world, that is musically spoken not of great interest.
On 'L'instant d'apres' something completely different is going on. It documents a fruitful collaboration of Diatribes, a promising outfit from Geneva, that has been reviewed earlier for Vital Weekly. Here they join forces with Dragos Tara, a rumanian artist living in Switzerland who studied at the conservatory of Geneva. He played in several rock, jazz, classical and what have you more combinations. Nowadays he is mainly active in projects of improvised music. The information concerning the other musician that takes part in this project, Piero SK, is a bit more mysterious and doubtful. From what I understand he is an autodidact working in the fields of theatre, writing and music. Tara plays doublebass and Piero SK soprano saxophone. They don't play together. In one track Tara participates, in the other Piero Sk, and so on. Making up a trio with Diatribes who are of Cyril Bondi (drums, percussion) and D'Incise (laptop, objects, live treatments). The cdr contains seven improvisations recorded in Geneva and Lausanne in 2008. The drumwork by Bondi is the dominating force in most of these improvisations. In the opening track "Entorse aus textures" his drumming is like a constant ever changing stream, putting different accents all the time. The bass by Tara moves in many different corners and edges. A very engaging improvisation, with laptop input by D'Incise that is not to be underestimated.
The second track "Le givre" is a more open and closer to silence, with long notes played by the saxplayer. All improvisations are full of tension and delicate. There is nicely intertwined communication playing by drums, sounds and bass and sax. High quality improvisations. (Dolf Mulder) Address: http://www.moremars.org/

COLLIN THOMAS - WINDOWS/WALKS (MP3, private)
Back in Vital Weekly 655 I reviewed 'For The Painters' by Collin Thomas, which was inspired by various painters and Thomas used percussion and processing thereof as his tools of trade. This new album is however something else. No percussion as far as I can tell, but as extensive use of field recordings and 'a small amount of instruments', as Thomas writes. That may include a piano, I think. A few nights ago I woke of heavy thunder. As it was six in the morning, the birds were already up. After a giant thunder, one could hear just the birds and then slowly heavy rain came, which died out rather quickly, and the birds and occasional thunder remained. As a musical event I thought that was beautiful. But it wasn't captured on tape, so was it music? I wish I did a recording and maybe added some piano, but it seems not necessary. The field recordings made by Thomas seem to me sound events that happen too, like rain at night, ice hitting the window and other watery events. Collins sits back and watches things happening, sometimes tinkling the piano. He may have added a bit of processing afterwards, but if so, he kept that to a strict minimum. This music is what Brian Eno intended when he thought of Ambient music. Music that surrounds you. Best played at a low volume, doors and windows open, and let whatever is happening on this disc tickle through with what whatever is happening around you. Nice one. Should have been a CDR release! (FdW) Address: http://www.collinthomas.net

HENRIK RYLANDER - POWER MODEL X (MOTHERBOARD DRONE LIVE) (CD by Ideal Recordings)
Drone music is a term that appears a lot in these pages, but it can take many forms. It can soft, ambient, new age like. It can be based on field recordings, on computer processing thereof. But the minority of drone music is loud, electronic and very present. Such is the case with this work by Henrik Rylander. It dates from 2006 and is an installation piece that 'consists of 10 small audio mixers connected to a motherboard. Each of the small mixers have a cable from output to input. Ten channels of feedback sounds are mixed into two", is the description of this installation and makes up the first forty-one minutes of this CD. Maybe you know how one no input mixer sounds? Imagine ten of those, but the setting is all in the lower frequency range, making your environment rumble and shake. This is strictly minimal in approach and differences are perhaps there but never easy to spot. This is where audio becomes an illusion. Are changes there or am I just making these up? Its not easy to tell. But its a great piece. Maybe you wouldn't want to play the concert version right after this (lasting twenty-eight minutes), but I did, to get the full experience and noted two things: things move to a mid end frequency here, droning out on the low end, and there is changes in this piece, no doubt due to the fact that this is a live piece and not a somewhat more static installation piece. I must admit its a bit much to swallow at once, but its surely quite nice. (FdW)
Address: http://www.idealrecordings.com

PTU - HARD WEEK (CD by Laton)
ANDRES LOO - SKELETONS ON ROCK (CD by Laton)
I am not sure if the track titles on PTU' s Hard Week refer to the days they were recorded, but this probably the case. There is mention of one night as well, so that may explain the hard week. In any case this is not a hard disc to listen to. At a first glance (strange expression really, for music) it sounds as if we are dealing with analogue minimalist techno. A hint of the the origins of the musicians is expressively present in the first track. The solo synth without doubt sounds like a Russian folklore dance orchestra. It must be said that this is not the case in the other tracks, but there is another issue with those: for some reason I seem to have heard them all before, but not like this. It's almost as if techno has been reinvented by PTU, complete with part of its history, but in their own quirky way. And sometimes that's very funny and one other thing: most of the tracks will get some feet off the floor. This can definitely be played more than once without a problem. A note on the cover design: one of the best in times!
Skeletons on Rock (brilliant title!) by Andres Loo (the first o should come with a tilde, but i can't get it done, my fault!) bursts in with a sample based rhythmic track with radio filtered singsong. One must adjust a little right here. Clearly (drum)computer music with funny singing, badly recorded. Track two is sort of a repetition or lengthening of the first. Track three however is a straightforward cut up piece with the same sort of voice, recorded well this time. Rhythm is still there, and lots of silent breaks. Pretty weird really. After this things get even weirder: cut up sounds rhythmically sewn together, sometimes accompanied by live drums. So far I have to say I like this quite a lot because of its weirdness. The switch between noisy rhythms and eery singing parts works very well. But it must also be said that 51 minutes of this concept is a little longish, it could have been shorter or other elements should have been added. Still, quite a remarkable record and absolutely worth listening.
Address: http://www.laton.at

ALAN SONDHEIM & MYK FREEDMAN - JULU TWINE (CD by Porter)
PROFOUND SOUND TRIO - OPUS DE LIFE (CD by Porter)
FRANCESCO GIANNICO - FOLKANIZATION (CD by Porter)
Three more releases from the highly productive Porter Records. Very regularly you find reviews of their releases in Vital weekly. How do they manage to release so many records I often ask myself? This time we have a trio, a duo and a solowork in our hands. With Francesco Giannico's (aka Mark Hamn) 'Folkanization' we are in an electro-acoustic environment. Giannico is from south Italy and worked originally as a guitarist. Since about ten years however he concentrates on narrative and filmic soundsculptures. On this CD Giannico shows his skills in twelve, combining acoustic instruments, field recordings, prerecorded music, and other soundsources. He structures this material into ambient-like soundminiatures that often have melodic tendencies. Very imaginative pieces, like 'Blue Lute' are the result. Giannico knows how to produce excellent blends.

'Julu Twine' is the name of a project by Alan Sondheim and Myk Freedman. Sondheim has an unusual set of guitars to his disposal. He plays 1949 Digiorgio Classic guitar, 1910-20 parlor Guitar, 1920 Ternor Banjo, 1870 Neuner & Hornsteiner Elegie Alpine Cither, 1930 Prime Alpine Zither. Sondheim plays since the sixties but worked mainly as a writer. His companion on this CD is Myk Freedman who plays just lap steel. In thirteen improvisations we are introduced to the particular possibilities of these instruments and their players. The expression 'experimental folkmusic' covers correctly what is going on here. Improvisations with a bluesy feel or touches of country music. Of course it is interesting to hear the color and other characteristics of these old instruments. This aspect I liked most. The improvisations themselves are less satisfying. The Profound Sound Trio is Andrew Cyrille (drums), Henry Grimes (bass) and Paul Dunmall (saxophone, bagpipes). Cyrille and Grimes come from the free jazz scene around Cecil Taylor. Paul Dunmall is a younger musician from England and plays most maniacal and mean of them all. Very spirited and raw improvisations come from these three experienced improvisors. Long solos followed by intense interplay and not one dull moment. (Dolf Mulder) Address: http://www.porterrecords.com/

IRR.APP.(EXT.) - KREISELWELLE (CD by The Helen Scarsdale Agency)
Its been a while but perhaps due to the liveliness of the current Nurse With Wound line up winning over stages, and M.S. Waldron being part of that line up, his own Irr.App. (Ext.) needed time to complete his Wilhelm Reich trilogy that started with 'Ozeanische Gefühle' (Vital Weekly 430) and 'Cosmic Superimposition' (Vital Weekly 585). Reich was a psychologist 'who proposed amongst many hypotheses, an interconnectivity between energy, organisms and the entire cosmos'. 'Kreiselwelle' translates as 'spiral wave', a 'structuralist form which Reich had observed throughout nature within numerous systems', so Waldron works with spiraling sounds: resonating springs, the waves of the sea, airwaves and such like. The two previous albums were high and mighty drone affairs, but this one, due to the nature of spiraling I guess is different. This album seems to be working from a perspective of loops. Environmental sounds, metallic rumble and electronics are all put in place here and Waldron creates a fine piece of environmental sound work. Its great to hear him break away from the two previous drone works and that makes it as a trilogy quite nice. If you play them all in a row, which is a great thing, I suggest to make the order like this: 'Ozeanische Gefühle', 'Kreiselwelle' and then at the end the austere dark 'Cosmic Superimposition'. Guaranteed a two hour cosmic trip. (FdW)
Address: http://www.helenscarsdale.com

LUNAR ABYSS DEUS ORGANUM - PUNTURY (CD by Aquarellist)
MIGUEL A. RUIZ & BARDOSENETICUBE - EXCLUSION ZONE (CD by Aquarellist)
SISTER LOOLOMIE & KRYPTOGEN RUNDFUNK - [W]INTERLOOP[S] (CDR by Still Sleep)
Three times Russia at work, with connections to eachother all around showing the vibrancy of the electronic underground scene over there. Almost all of this was witnessed live in one form or another. Lunar Abyss Deus Organum is a trio of E.S. on noises, voices and sounds, M.M. on guitars, synths and tapes and Kshatriy on mastering. Their concert was nice, but it seemed to be unfocussed at times, partly due to the nature of improvising and a big love for sound effects. It made me think that perhaps not all music is suited for an outdoor performance. On CD things sound the same, but one has the opportunity to play it under different circumstances, and then this mood music works much better. The music is largely based around voice manipulations of E.S., who feeds it through a long line of sound effects and adds to that the voice 'as is', chanting, humming, whispering and such like, but never using 'words' or 'lyrics' - well, at least in my perception that is. There is of course an undercurrent in this music that makes it 'ritualistic', with its sometimes ethnical flutes and voices, but overall it stays on the good side of things, mainly due to the nice field recordings and the guitar providing some more experimental workings. This makes this into quite a nice and enjoyable release which works best late night and in the dark.
On the same label, but a concert sadly missed is a release by the duo Bardoseneticcube, who have been active for many years, who do a collaboration with long serving Spanish hero Miguel A. Ruiz. The Russians supply 'basic sounds and samples' while Ruiz add 'sounds, track arrangements and mastering'. What can be noted here, in difference with the previous work of Bardoseneticcube is the presence of rhythm, lots of rhythm actually. They form the solid backbone of the music, which otherwise involves field recordings and electronics. The rhythm part is solid, minimal but truly techno inspired. It bangs and it bangs. It reminded me of of the CD 'Electroid' by Sympathy Nervous from 1994. It has that same solid attitude. The field recordings are also sampled while the electronics are used to play around with, to add that somewhat nice krautrock and psychedelic touch to the music. Despite its minimalism there are lots of minor changes going on, that add a really nice edge to the music. Quite powerful stuff going on here, and a solid, fine work.
M.M., also known as Kryptogen Rundfunk played a great set of electronic music with at times earpiercing waves and then more subtle tones at other occasions. Here he teams up with [s], the man from Moscow whom we best know as Five Elements Music, a refined master of drone music, but who apparently works under many guises, and Sister Loolomie is one of them. I guess this is a sort of guise to work inside more noisy textures of music, even when he is credited on the cover for guitar, synth, cosmic vibrations and radiowaves, whereas M.M. plays radiowaves and computer processing. Winter music this is indeed as this is a piece (one track, thirty minutes, only) of piercing cold electronics, which towards the very end shows a bit of spring time. Having said that, it may sound negative, but its not. This is actually a great piece, in which the harsher sounds prevail at one point, but things never go over the top and the two know how to cut back their sound and start working again from a softer perspective. A great combination of harsher sounds and more ambient textures. Winter in Russia is hard and these two provide the soundtrack for a long winter evening. Even when its june and the sun is high and mighty. Great work. (FdW)
Address: <fem_s@inbox.ru>
Address: http://aquarellist.ru

SLEEP WHALE - LITTLE BRITE (LP by Western Vinyl)
From Denton, Texas hail Sleep Whale, a duo of
guitarist/cellist Joel North and violinist/sequence programmer Bruce Blay. Six tracks they have on 'Little Brite' and it lasts around twenty-six minutes and that's straight away the downside of the album. Its too short. What Sleep Whale do here is great. A fine collection of instrumental pieces in which the acoustic instruments play an all important role, but they are amplified to get that rock like drive, while all sorts of electronic and computer processings make this a highly vibrant thing. Think Fennesz on 'Endless Summer' but with the balance towards the 'real' instruments. If you remember: think The Books. It has a great summer like feeling to it, highly rhythmical in playing, dramatic and melancholic at times, and joyous at other times. Chamber music like but from a duo, digital folk or folk going digital perhaps, a bit ethnic in its use of rhythms. This is an excellent record that fits the cool pre-summer breeze and mild sun of today. A record to make you happy. It did for me. Wowie. (FdW) Address: http://www.westernvinyl.com

MUDBOY - MUSIC FOR ANY SPEED (7" by Lexi Disques)
Currently Mudboy is touring Europe (as I didn't notice, but Lexi Disques says so) and on that occasion this 7" is released, which, despite its title, should be played at 33 rpm. Mudboy hails from Providence, Rhode Island and is from the same scene as Lightning Bolt. Mudboy has had various releases of which the one I reviewed on Digitalis Industries made a good impression on me. Drones, rhythm machines and well produced. No rhythm machines here, I think, but still excellent produced. 'Freeze' is a piece of a slowly dying drone. It is basically a long fade of drone music for guitar and sound effects. 'Thaw' (which start seems like the end of 'Freeze' actually) on the other side is also about fierce guitars and pitch shifted organ like and is almost (almost!) a pop song. A rollercoaster ride in the dark. A psychedelic nightmare if you wish. Two fine songs. I wonder how that would sound live! (FdW)
Address: http://www.lexidisques.net

GARETH DAVIS & MACHINEFABRIEK - SOUNDLINES (3" CDR by Machinefabriek)
The name Gareth Davis (bass clarinet and contrabass clarinet) doesn't ring any bells here, but for this small release he teams up with Rutger Zuydervelt (computer, guitar and effects), better known as Machinefabriek of course. Three pieces on this 3", of which the first is the score for 'The Sounding Lines Are Obsolete', a film by John Price. The clarinet produces some mighty fine drone like sounds and hardly sounds like a clarinet. It mingles nicely with the computer and guitar treatments pushed forward by Zuydervelt. Highly atmospheric music but very dark. I wonder what the film looks like after hearing this, but no doubt it must be quite mysterious. 'Intermission' and 'Soundlines' arrive without notice: it seems if all three pieces flow right into eachother. That might be a bit of downer as perhaps one expected something different. But taken as a whole this is a great release. Nocturnal pastoral music. (FdW)
Address: http://www.machinefabriek.nu

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